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BatsBatProofing 

Unnecessary killing of bats is not environmentally sound, humane or a permanent solution to the problem. Using chemicals or pesticides creates a risk of long-term toxic exposure to humans and causes sick or dying bats to be grounded in the community, further increasing the chance of contact with people and pets.


How to Bat-Proof?

Bats should be kept out of places with a high risk of bat contact with humans or pets (for example, schools, hospitals, prisons, homes) by closing or covering openings that allow entry to the roost. To find these openings, watch bats enter or leave the building at dusk or just before dawn. To bat-proof, use polypropylene bird netting, fly screening, sheet metal, wood or various caulking compounds, keeping in mind that house bats can pass through crevices as thin as a pencil. Before bat-proofing, make sure there are no bats already in the roost.


When to Bat-Proof?

The best time to bat-proof is late fall through winter when bats are hibernating in caves, or at night when bats are away from the roost (before mid-June or after mid-August). All openings except one or two major exits may be closed in advance, and the last openings sealed while the animals are away.


What Services Are Available?

  • Rabies Testing
  • Information Packets
  • Phone Assistance

All services are free to Clinton County residents.

 

INFO BAR


Further Reading

Facts about Bats

How to Catch a Bat Video

Bats at Children's Camps

White-nose Syndrome

Bat Capture information

CDC's Rabies Info


Contact Us
Clinton County Health Department
Environmental Health & Safety Division
(518) 565-4870    

ATUPA

 

 

MENU
menu

BatsBatProofing 

Unnecessary killing of bats is not environmentally sound, humane or a permanent solution to the problem. Using chemicals or pesticides creates a risk of long-term toxic exposure to humans and causes sick or dying bats to be grounded in the community, further increasing the chance of contact with people and pets.


How to Bat-Proof?

Bats should be kept out of places with a high risk of bat contact with humans or pets (for example, schools, hospitals, prisons, homes) by closing or covering openings that allow entry to the roost. To find these openings, watch bats enter or leave the building at dusk or just before dawn. To bat-proof, use polypropylene bird netting, fly screening, sheet metal, wood or various caulking compounds, keeping in mind that house bats can pass through crevices as thin as a pencil. Before bat-proofing, make sure there are no bats already in the roost.


When to Bat-Proof?

The best time to bat-proof is late fall through winter when bats are hibernating in caves, or at night when bats are away from the roost (before mid-June or after mid-August). All openings except one or two major exits may be closed in advance, and the last openings sealed while the animals are away.


What Services Are Available?

  • Rabies Testing
  • Information Packets
  • Phone Assistance

All services are free to Clinton County residents.

 

INFO BAR


Further Reading

Facts about Bats

How to Catch a Bat Video

Bats at Children's Camps

White-nose Syndrome

Bat Capture information

CDC's Rabies Info


Contact Us
Clinton County Health Department
Environmental Health & Safety Division
(518) 565-4870    

ATUPA